Every specialist strives to create long lasting change with the staff they work with. School districts are on the move trying to match the ever evolving world we live in. This long lasting change is a two way street. It takes input, reflection, effort, and ideas from both parties. As I reflected on my most recent work, I was struck by the types of questions that I am being asked. Some questions are great, while some are good. Notice that I did not frame any question as bad. If you are asking questions, you are doing better than the teacher who doesn't! 

What questions DO lead to long lasting change?
  • (Self Reflection) How else can I use this?
    • Transferring knowledge between knowledge bridges your neural pathways. You are literally expanding your brain when you take existing knowledge, and apply it to a new skill/task.
  • How can this be used throughout the day?
    • Discovering skills/work that can be used universally aids in your ability to be creative with technology. Your goal should be to create an "invisible presence" with technology, causing little to no break between analog and digital creation.
  • Can we set up a regular meeting?
    • I LOVE to hear this. Not only does it tell me that you trust me and are willing to learn, but I know that we are going down a path to create habitual changes!
  • Where else can I learn?
    • This question is one that I get asked by the savvy technology users. It is a double edged sword in my mind. These teachers can independently learn new innovative work, while I have time to meet face to face with those who need it. Instilling self directed PD in staff is a MUST!
What questions do NOT lead to long lasting change? 
These questions are the ones that I call technology band aids. They give you the sensation that you are integrating technology, but really you are not making any difference below the surface. 
  • Can you help me put technology into "insert specific topic"?
    • Trying to fit technology into subjects is the wrong way to go about integration. Technology should be surrounding every aspect of your lesson from hook to assessment. There should not be an off switch.
  • Do you know of any apps to help with "insert specific topic"?
    • Specific apps do not teach students. If your students learn more from Raz kids or IXL, why are you there?
  • Can you help me take a test using technology?
    • Channeling technology into just one aspect of your classroom will not create sound skill development in your students. Surround every aspect of your lessons with technology.
  • Can you make "insert specific lesson" for me?
    • Although this is a starting spot, you have to move past this. Constantly leaning on the crutch of having someone else do it or find it will not get you anywhere. Yes, you need to use the resources around you, but you also need to absorb the skills being demonstrated.